Archive for the ‘official-courses’ Category

How to Do Post Production Sound

How to Do Post Production Sound

Overview

Running time: 59 minutes, 10 Lessons

OVERVIEW: Want to learn how to professionally edit and mix your projects? Learn from Brian San Marco, an industry veteran who has spent more than 25 years working with sound recording, mixing, mastering and restoration.

 

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How to Do Post Production Sound

How to Be Confident on Camera

Overview

Running time: 25 minutes, 2 Chapters, 8 Lessons 

Learn how to be confident on camera to keep your audience engaged in your message. Get in the right mindset to stay focused. Sound conversational and connect with your audience. Use a script or get spontaneous to capture attention and keep your video fun and fresh.

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How to Be Confident on Camera

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CreatorUp Announces Fall 2015 Accelerator Programs

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We’re launching our fall accelerator programs, and now is your chance to become a part of the fun! Take a look at our calendar, and see which one is right for you. We will promote your projects, and some winning projects are eligible for cash awards and promotion from our brand collaboration partners. Check out the awesome projects of our accelerator alumni below! (more…)

4-2: Creating Bonus Content (SF)

Key Points

Bonus Content

  • Bonus content rewards audiences for watching and gives them more
  • Simultaneous stories can be a place for your secondary characters to have their own deeper storylines
  • Epilogues can tie up loose threads or give audiences a glimpse into a new season
  • Bonus content can be completely different from your existing show, giving you a chance to experiment with styles and forms

TO DO

Write bonus content that is different from your main series, but still ties back thematically.

4-1: Write Extra Content (SF)

Key Points

Extra Content Types

  • Bonus Videos come in all shapes and sizes
  • Character profiles are a nice way to go deeper into the lives of your characters for your audience
  • Sci-fi “world” history videos can give your audience a better understanding of the world you’ve created
  • Consider the variety of ways your series can expand using additional content to distribute before, during, or after your regular episode releases

TO DO

  • Write a character profile scene
  • Write a scene that takes place before your series begins

3-4: Utilizing Feedback (SF)

Key Points

Making Feedback Useful

  • Other writers can provide constructive writing feedback
  • Friends offer great notes because they understand your intentions
  • Don’t ruin others’ reading experience by telling them everything before they read
  • Listen for feedback about what worked according to your intentions
  • Ignore feedback that seems to be from left field
  • Use feedback to focus your vision, not destroy your story

TO DO

  • Rewrite the first draft of your script
  • Gather feedback from two completely different sources
  • Evaluate the notes and incorporate useful feedback and ignore feedback that is off point

3-3: Experiment with Form (SF)

Key Points

Experimental Form Ideas

  • Combine or split episodes if it makes sense
  • Withhold information – don’t tell the audience everything
  • Provide multiple perspectives of the story
  • Consider non-linear storytelling as a structure style for your series
  • Explore alternate reality perspectives like dream sequences
  • Consider any effects that may work for your story

TO DO

Brainstorm and write down some experimental form ideas for your series.

3-2: Write Efficiently (SF)

Key Points

Storytelling for the Web

  • Since viewers can click away at anytime, it’s important to keep your story moving at all times. Make sure the action is tight and the dialogue is snappy
  • Cut unnecessary dialogue if a character intention can be communicated with a look or an action
  • Get rid of anything that’s excessive or “pure exposition” telling the viewers exactly what’s going on
  • Cut down your descriptions to only the things that are absolutely necessary to see on screen
  • Look out for redundancies, and get rid of anything you’re showing twice
  • Keep viewers engaged by ending early – better to have them wanting more than getting bored

TO DO

Cut out an extra dialogue, description, or action that doesn’t keep the story moving forward.

3-1: Rewrite your Script (SF)

Key Points

Re-writing Guidelines

  • Review the logic of your first draft: do things make sense?
  • Evaluate the tone of your story: do the characters, dialogue, and world reflect your intentions? Does the tone match the expectations of a sci-fi audience? Is it consistent from scene to scene?
  • Are your characters working? Make sure their behavior and dialogue is consistent with their backstory, and that their story arcs are evolving according to the goals and obstacles you set up for them.
  • Did you build in story hooks?

TO DO

Review your script, and evaluate the logic, structure, characters, and hooks you wrote.

2-4: How to Write your First Draft (SF)

Key Points

First Draft Strategies

  • Get your ideas on paper without being a perfectionist
  • Deviate from your outline when you feel it’s appropriate
  • Focus on dialogue
  • Begin with a mystery
  • Start in the middle
  • Read it out loud
  • Raise the conflict

TO DO

Write the first draft of your first season.

2-3: How to Format your Story for the Web (SF)

Key Points

Web Series Structure and Format

  • Begin and End Each Episode with a Heading and Footer: Episode 1, End of Episode 1
  • Screenwriting software options: Final Draft, Movie Magic, Scripped, and Celtx (Celtx is free, and Scripped has a nice community of writers and contests as monthly subscription service.
  • Orient viewers with headlines of information you want them to know, for example: TITLE: TWO WEEKS LATER

TO DO

  • Familiarize yourself with screenwriting software and formatting.
  • Import your outline into screenplay format.

2-2: Raising the Stakes (SF)

Key Points

Setting and Raising the Stakes

  • Stakes: The consequences for your characters not reaching their goals
  • Define what the stakes for your characters are: in other words, what will happen to them if they don’t reach their goals?
  • Raising the stakes: make bigger consequences, make it personal, add a ticking clock
  • Define series “hooks” – cliffhangers at the end of each episode that make audiences want to watch the next episode

TO DO

  • Raise the stakes for each character.
  • Make every episode end with a hook.

2-1: How to Create a Series Outline (SF)

Key Points

Creating the Outline

  • Write scenes down as bullet points, use post it notes as scenes, or pin scene card to a bulletin board
  • Build the major beats (turning points) as sign posts of your story
  • Episode one goals: establish the rules of the road, introduce your characters, and establish character goals
  • Establish a point of entry for your audience, how can they understand the rules of the road?
  • Which point of view will you use to tell your story?
  • Each character goal deserves its own storyline
  • Draw out your “A” Story (Main story), “B” Story (side story), and “C” Story (peripheral story)

TO DO

  • Outline your web series with scenes.
  • Label your scenes with the corresponding storylines “A” “B” or “C”.
  • Make sure your storylines match up with your character goals.

1-6: What Inspires your Story (SF)

Key Points

Inspiration Sources

  • Personal examples of existing shows: X-Files, Looper, The Booth at the End, BlackBoxTV, The Twilight Zone, Pioneer One, Quantum Leap
  • Books and magazine articles: Anthony Zuiker’s Cybergeddon
  • Your life: Your job, your friends, your family
  • Your motivation: Making people think? Just for fun?

TO DO

  • List at least 3 sci-fi films, TV shows, or web series that inspire you.
  • List at least 3 non-sci-fi films, TV shows, or web series that inspire you.
  • List at least 3 non-films/TV shows/web series that inspire you. (Novels, comics, art, music, people, news articles, etc. Of any genre.)

1-5: Making your Series Unique (SF)

Key Points

Creating a Unique Web Series

  • Change up the rules of the road
  • Uncover your world’s history
  • Offer deeper character backgrounds
  • Reveal new relationships
  • Surprise your audience

TO DO

Create a surprise for your first episode, and a surprise for your first season.

1-4: Memorable Characters (SF)

Key Points

Writing Characters Fans Will Love

  • Who are your main characters, and what are their backstories?
  • What are your characters’ goals, and what drives them?
  • What are the relationships between your characters?
  • What external and internal obstacles exist for each character?
  • What are your characters’ secrets?

TO DO

  • List your main characters and describe them.
  • Write a scene with your main characters to learn how they behave with each other.

1-3: Building the World (SF)

Key Points

Building the World

  • Where does the story take place? When are we? What happened before the story starts?
  • Make sure the logic of your story makes sense
  • What are the rules of your world? What makes it different from the real world? What separates it from the worlds of existing shows?

TO DO

  • Write the set-up for your world.
  • Write down the essential rules of the road.

1-2: How to Start Writing (SF)

Key Points

Web Series Screenplay Blueprint

  • Writing purpose: fun, contests & festivals, producing
  • Web series perks: worldwide distribution, engaging viewers, serialized storytelling, there are no rules
  • Sci-Fi concept templates: serialized, procedural, anthology?
  • Sub-genres: post-apocalyptic, time travel, near future?
  • Tone: Dark, tragic, cautionary tale?

TO DO

Write out the logline of your web series.

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